Alienum phaedrum torquatos nec eu, vis detraxit periculis ex, nihil expetendis in mei. Mei an pericula euripidis, hinc partem.

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

A program by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) aims to reduce the vulnerability of small-scale farmers through multi sectoral pro-poor policies, strategies and pro-poor investment plans at country and regional level, including the adaptation and mitigation to climate change. The program is developing approaches for planning and implementing water investments that...

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Conference: Prosperity through Hydrological Services will be held from 7 to 9 May, 2018 in Geneva. The general idea behind this Conference is to present, to decision makers and key practitioners worldwide, a holistic picture of the initiatives and solutions international organizations and their partners are promoting to improve the...

The Global Framework on Water Scarcity in Agriculture (WASAG) has been designed to bring together key players across the globe and across sectors to tackle the collective challenge of using water better in agriculture to ensure food security for all. It is an initiative for partners from all fields and backgrounds to collaborate in supporting countries...

A Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) action framework, aims to provide workable solutions, available for stakeholders at different scales - from the policy level to the farm level - to sustainably increase agricultural land and water productivity. The framework will be based on robust state of the art remote sensing and information...

Water quality in agriculture, in other words water pollution from and to agriculture, is a focus area for Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), under which different global and national projects and programs are identified. FAO looks at agriculture as a cause and victim of water pollution, and based on that defines...

While the world population grew from 2.5 billion in 1950 to over 7.5 billion today, the irrigated area doubled and water withdrawals tripled. Agricultural productivity grew thanks to new crop varieties and fertilizers, fuelled by additional irrigation water. World food production outstripped population growth. And the greater use of water for irrigated agriculture benefited farmers...